Ultra Rare 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Shooting Brake Goes Under Hammer

The 1965 Aston Martin DB5 shooting brake is one of the rarest versions of the DB5 ever built and it’s now up for auction. People know it better as James Bond’s original car. However, this particular model is an upgraded unit named DB5/2273/L, whose structure has been massively overhauled by David Brown, the former owner of Aston Martin as well as the initiator of DB-line models that live to this day.

If there were 1965 DB5 owners who felt frustrated with the car’s impracticality, then Brown was one of them. His polo gear couldn’t fit into the coupe’s luggage compartment, while his dog was there in the car, chewing up the leather seats as it didn’t have enough loose space to sit. All this frustration led to the creation of the Aston Martin DB5 shooting brake by Harold Radford. He got one for himself and sold 11 others to wealthy buyers who felt the same about the regular DB5.

Ultra Rare 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Shooting Brake Goes Under Hammer

Shooting brakes are the best solution to storage limitations in sports cars, since they expand room for belongings while maintaining the slim shape of the vehicle. Their only downside is that they involve a rather costly process. It’s definitely not cheap to rebuild most of the car, which is why only 12 units of the DB5/2273/L were ever made, with four of them being left-handed, including the specific example currently up for sale.

The car spent its whole life in Switzerland with only three private owners since new. The DB5 became fresh again in 2009 as its body and chassis were completely restored, giving it an original silver hue repaint and contrasting deep blue carpets. Its engine, shocks and springs have also been upgraded during the restoration.

Ultra Rare 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Shooting Brake Goes Under Hammer

The 1965 Aston Martin DB5 shooting brake will go under hammer at RM Sotheby’s flagship Monterey sale during the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance week. Interested in buying it? Just prepare between $1 million and $1.4 million. That’s the estimated value of the classic car. The DB5’s rarity clearly explains why it’s that expensive, although the Hagerty price guide says its value is rather high. A concours-quality DB5 shooting brake is pegged at $790,000, while a concours-quality DB5 coupe is valued at $1.45 million, according to the collector car value guide.

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